Popularity
2.4
Growing
Activity
0.0
Stable
27
2
3

Description

An extension of the worker queue pattern described in http://marcio.io/2015/07/handling-1-million-requests-per-minute-with-golang/ or http://nesv.github.io/golang/2014/02/25/worker-queues-in-go.html to allow graceful stopping, queryable work status, and more generic jobs.

Programming language: Go
License: GNU General Public License v3.0 or later
Tags: Workers     Goroutines     Task Queue    
Latest version: v1.0

Bifrost alternatives and similar packages

Based on the "Goroutines" category.
Alternatively, view Bifrost alternatives based on common mentions on social networks and blogs.

Do you think we are missing an alternative of Bifrost or a related project?

Add another 'Goroutines' Package

README

ᛉ Bifröst - a queryable in-process worker queue

Go Report Card GoDoc blog

[gofrost](repo/vikgopher.gif "BiFrost")

Package bifrost contains functionality to create an in-process job queue with a configurable number of goroutine via workers. It also includes the ability to query scheduled jobs for status (completed jobs are purged at a configurable interval)

package main

import (
    "encoding/json"
    "fmt"
    "github.com/serdmanczyk/bifrost"
    "os"
    "time"
)

func main() {
    stdoutWriter := json.NewEncoder(os.Stdout)
    dispatcher := bifrost.NewWorkerDispatcher(
        bifrost.Workers(4),
        bifrost.JobExpiry(time.Millisecond),
    )

    // Queue a job func
    tracker := dispatcher.QueueFunc(func() error {
        time.Sleep(time.Microsecond)
        return nil
    })

    // Queue a 'JobRunner'
    dispatcher.Queue(bifrost.JobRunnerFunc(func() error {
        time.Sleep(time.Microsecond)
        return nil
    }))

    // Print out incomplete status
    status := tracker.Status()
    stdoutWriter.Encode(&status)
    // {"ID":0,"Complete":false,"Start":"2017-03-23T21:51:27.140681968-07:00"}

    // wait on completion
    <-tracker.Done()
    // Status is now complete
    status = tracker.Status()
    stdoutWriter.Encode(&status)
    // {"ID":0,"Complete":true,"Success":true,"Start":"2017-03-23T21:51:27.140681968-07:00","Finish":"2017-03-23T21:51:27.140830827-07:00"}

    // Queue a job that will 'fail'
    tracker = dispatcher.QueueFunc(func() error {
        time.Sleep(time.Microsecond)
        return fmt.Errorf("Failed")
    })

    // Show failure status
    <-tracker.Done()
    status = tracker.Status()
    stdoutWriter.Encode(&status)
    // {"ID":2,"Complete":true,"Success":false,"Error":"Failed","Start":"2017-03-23T21:51:27.141026625-07:00","Finish":"2017-03-23T21:51:27.141079871-07:00"}

    // Query for a job's status.
    tracker, _ = dispatcher.JobStatus(tracker.ID())
    status = tracker.Status()
    stdoutWriter.Encode(&status)
    // {"ID":2,"Complete":true,"Success":false,"Error":"Failed","Start":"2017-03-23T21:51:27.141026625-07:00","Finish":"2017-03-23T21:51:27.141079871-07:00"}

    // Show all jobs
    jobs := dispatcher.Jobs()
    stdoutWriter.Encode(jobs)
    // [{"ID":2,"Complete":true,"Success":false,"Error":"Failed","Start":"2017-03-23T21:51:27.141026625-07:00","Finish":"2017-03-23T21:51:27.141079871-07:00"},{"ID":0,"Complete":true,"Success":true,"Start":"2017-03-23T21:51:27.140681968-07:00","Finish":"2017-03-23T21:51:27.140830827-07:00"},{"ID":1,"Complete":true,"Success":true,"Start":"2017-03-23T21:51:27.140684331-07:00","Finish":"2017-03-23T21:51:27.140873087-07:00"}]

    // wait for jobs to be purged
    time.Sleep(time.Millisecond * 5)

    // should now be empty
    jobs = dispatcher.Jobs()
    stdoutWriter.Encode(jobs)
    // []

    dispatcher.Stop()
}

Why?

If you've read the blog posts Handling 1 Million Requests per Minute with Go or Writing worker queues, in Go this will look very familiar. The main machinery in Bifrost is basically identical to the functionality described in those blog posts, but with a couple added features I wanted for my project.

Added Features:

  • Generic jobs: any func() error or type that implements func Run() error can be queued as a job.
  • Graceful shutdown: when dispatcher is stopped, waits for running jobs to complete.
  • Tracking: queued jobs are given an ID that can be used to query for status later.
  • Cleanup: completed jobs are cleaned up after a configurable amount of time.

Lacks (might add these later):

  • Lost jobs: if the dispatcher is stopped before all jobs are sent to a worker, unsent jobs may be ignored.
  • Errant jobs: jobs taking longer than expected cannot be cancelled.
  • Single process: this package does not include functionality to schedule jobs across multiple processes via AMQP, gRPC, or otherwise.

For an example, see the [test](dispatcher_test.go) or example [command line app](example/main.go).

Obligatory "not for use in production" but I do welcome feedback.

Etymology

Bifröst (pronounce B-eye-frost popularly, or traditionally more like Beefroast) is the bridge between the realms of Earth and Asgard (the heavens) in norse mythology.

The Futhark ᛉ Elhaz/Algiz is seen as the symbol for Bifröst, or at least according to this thing I Googled.

The symbology intended is that dispatcher is a 'bridge' between the scheduling goroutine and the worker goroutine.

Honestly I just needed a cool Norse thing to name this, I was reaching. Not to be taken too seriously.