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Programming language: Go
License: MIT License
Tags: Json    

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README

vjson

[codecov](#) Go Report Card [<miladibra10>](#) Go Reference

vjson is a Go package that helps to validate JSON objects in a declarative way.

Getting Started

Installing

For installing vjson, use command below:

go get -u github.com/miladibra10/vjson

Concepts

There are two main concepts in vjson that are:

  • Schema
  • Field

Schema

A schema is the holder of JSON object specifications. It contains the way of validation of a JSON object. a schema consists of an array of fields.

Field

A field contains characteristics of a specific field of a json object. multiple field types are supported by vjson. list of supported types are:

  • integer
  • float
  • string
  • boolean
  • array
  • object
  • null

How to create a Schema

There are two ways to create a schema.

  • Schema could be declared in code in a declarative manner.
  • Schema could be parsed from a file or string.

Schema in code

Schema could be declared in code like this:

package main

import "github.com/miladibra10/vjson"

func main() {
    schema := vjson.NewSchema(
        vjson.String("name").Required(),
    )

    jsonString := `
    {
        "name": "James"
    }
    `

    err := schema.ValidateString(jsonString)
    if err != nil {
        panic(err)
    }
}

schema object contains a string field, named name. This code validates jsonString.

Parse Schema

Schema could be parsed from a file or a string. These methods help to parse schema.

Format of schema for parsing should be a json like this:

{
  "fields": [
    ...
  ]
}

fields should contain field specifications.

This code parses a schema from string:

package main

import "github.com/miladibra10/vjson"

func main() {
    schemaStr := `
    {
        "fields": [
            {
                "name": "name",
                "type": "string"
                "required": true
            }
        ]
    }
    `
    schema, err := vjson.ReadFromString(schemaStr)
    if err != nil {
        panic(err)
    }

    jsonString := `
    {
        "name": "James"
    }
    `

    err = schema.ValidateString(jsonString)
    if err != nil {
        panic(err)
    }
}

schemaStr describes the schema and vjson.ReadFromString(schemaStr) parses the string and returns a schema object.

schema object contains a string field, named name. This code validates jsonString.

Fields

Integer

An integer field could be created in code like this:

vjson.Integer("foo")

some validation characteristics could be added to an integer field with chaining some functions:

  • Required() sets the field as a required field. validation will return an error if a required field is not present in json object.
  • Min(min int) forces the integer field to be greater than min in validating json object.
  • Max(max int) forces the integer field to be lower than max in validating json object.
  • Positive() checks if the value of field is positive.
  • Negative() checks if the value of field is negative.
  • Range(start, end int) adds a range for integer field. the value of json field should be within this range.

integer field could be described by a json for schema parsing.

  • name: the name of the field
  • type: type value for integer field must be integer
  • required: whether the field is required or not
  • min: minimum value of field
  • max: maximum value of field
  • positive: a boolean that describes that a field is positive or negative (true for positive and false for negative)
  • ranges: an array of ranges to be checked in field validation.

Example

an integer field, named foo which is required, minimum value should be 2, maximum value should be 10, should be positive and be within range [3,5] or [6,8] ,could be declared like this:

Code

vjson.Integer("foo").Required().Min(2).Max(10).Positive().Range(3,5).Range(6,8)

File

{
  "name": "foo",
  "type": "integer",
  "required": true,
  "min": 2,
  "max": 10,
  "positive": true,
  "ranges": [
    {
      "start": 3,
      "end": 5
    },
    {
      "start": 6,
      "end": 8
    }
  ]
}

Float

A float field could be created in code like this:

vjson.Float("foo")

some validation characteristics could be added to a float field with chaining some functions:

  • Required() sets the field as a required field. validation will return an error if a required field is not present in json object.
  • Min(min float64) forces the float field to be greater than min in validating json object.
  • Max(max float64) forces the float field to be lower than max in validating json object.
  • Positive() checks if the value of field is positive.
  • Negative() checks if the value of field is negative.
  • Range(start, end float64) adds a range for float field. the value of json field should be within this range.

float field could be described by a json for schema parsing.

  • name: the name of the field
  • type: type value for float field must be float
  • required: whether the field is required or not
  • min: minimum value of field
  • max: maximum value of field
  • positive: a boolean that describes that a field is positive or negative (true for positive and false for negative)
  • ranges: an array of ranges to be checked in field validation.

Example

a float field, named foo which is required, minimum value should be 2.5, maximum value should be 10.5, should be positive and be within range [3,5] or [6,8] ,could be declared like this:

Code

vjson.Float("foo").Required().Min(2.5).Max(10.5).Positive().Range(3,5).Range(6,8)

File

{
  "name": "foo",
  "type": "float",
  "required": true,
  "min": 2.5,
  "max": 10.5,
  "positive": true,
  "ranges": [
    {
      "start": 3,
      "end": 5
    },
    {
      "start": 6,
      "end": 8
    }
  ]
}

String

A string field could be created in code like this:

vjson.String("foo")

some validation characteristics could be added to a string field with chaining some functions:

  • Required() sets the field as a required field. validation will return an error if a required field is not present in json object.
  • MinLength(min int) forces the length of string field to be greater than min in validating json object.
  • MaxLength(max int) forces the length of string field to be lower than max in validating json object.
  • Format(format string) gets a regex format and checks if value of json object matches the format.
  • Choices(choice ...string) checks if the value of string field is equal to one of choices.

float field could be described by a json for schema parsing.

  • name: the name of the field
  • type: type value for string field must be string
  • required: whether the field is required or not
  • min_length: minimum length of string value of field
  • max_length: maximum length of string value of field
  • format: a regex format and checks if value of json object matches the format.
  • choices: a list of strings that value of field should be equal to one of them.

Example

a string field, named foo which is required, minimum length value should be 2, maximum length value should be 10, should be Equal to one of these values: first, second could be declared like this:

Code

vjson.String("foo").Required().MinLength(2).MaxLength(10).Choices("first", "second")

File

{
  "name": "foo",
  "type": "string",
  "required": true,
  "min_length": 2,
  "max_length": 10,
  "choices": [
    "first",
    "second"
  ]
}

Boolean

A boolean field could be created in code like this:

vjson.Boolean("foo")

some validation characteristics could be added to a boolean field with chaining some functions:

  • Required() sets the field as a required field. validation will return an error if a required field is not present in json object.
  • ShouldBe(value bool) forces the value of field be equal to value

boolean field could be described by a json for schema parsing.

  • name: the name of the field
  • type: type value for boolean field must be boolean
  • required: whether the field is required or not
  • value: a boolean (same sa ShouldBe in code) that describes that the value of json field.

Example

a boolean field, named foo which is required, and always should be false, could be declared like this:

Code

vjson.Boolean("foo").Required().ShouldBe(false)

File

{
  "name": "foo",
  "type": "boolean",
  "required": true,
  "value": false
}

Array

An array field could be created in code like this:

vjson.Array("foo", vjson.String("item"))

the first argument is the name of array field, and the second one is the field characteristics of each item of array.

some validation characteristics could be added to an array field with chaining some functions:

  • Required() sets the field as a required field. validation will return an error if a required field is not present in json object.
  • MinLength(min int) forces the length of array field to be greater than min in validating json object.
  • MaxLength(max int) forces the length of array field to be lower than max in validating json object.

array field could be described by a json for schema parsing.

  • name: the name of the field
  • type: type value for array field must be array
  • required: whether the field is required or not
  • min_length: minimum length of array
  • max_length: maximum length of array
  • items: specifications of item fields. could be any field.

Example

an array field, named foo with integer items between [0,20] range, which is required, and its length should be at least 2 and at last 10, could be declared like this:

Code

vjson.Array("foo", vjson.Integer("item").Range(0,20)).Required().MinLength(2).MaxLength(10)

File

{
  "name": "foo",
  "type": "array",
  "required": true,
  "min_length": 2,
  "max_length": 10,
  "items": {
    "name": "item",
    "type": "integer",
    "ranges": [
      {
        "start": 0,
        "end": 20
      }
    ]
  }
}

Object

An object field could be created in code like this:

vjson.Object("foo", vjson.NewSchema(
        /// Fields  
    ))

the first argument is the name of object field, and the second one is the schema of object value. this feature helps validation of nested json objects

some validation characteristics could be added to an array field with chaining some functions:

  • Required() sets the field as a required field. validation will return an error if a required field is not present in json object.

object field could be described by a json for schema parsing.

  • name: the name of the field
  • type: type value for object field must be object
  • required: whether the field is required or not
  • schema: schema of object value.

Example

a required object field, named foo which its valid value is an object with name and last_name required strings, could be declared like this:

Code

vjson.Object("foo", vjson.NewSchema(
    vjson.String("name").Required(),
    vjson.String("last_name").Required(),
    )).Required()

File

{
  "name": "foo",
  "type": "object",
  "required": true,
  "schema": {
    "fields": [
      {
        "name": "name",
        "type": "string",
        "required": true
      },
      {
        "name": "last_name",
        "type": "string",
        "required": true
      }
    ]
  }
}

Null

A null field (a field that its value should be null!) could be created in code like this:

vjson.Null("foo")

null field could be described by a json for schema parsing.

  • name: the name of the field
  • type: type value for null field must be null

Example

a null field, named foo, could be declared like this:

Code

vjson.Null("foo")

File

{
  "name": "foo",
  "type": "null"
}

Validation

After creating a schema, you can validate your json objects with these methods:

  • ValidateBytes(input []byte): receives a byte array as a json input and validates it. this method returns an error. it would be nil if the object is valid, and it will return an error if the input object is not valid.
  • ValidateString(input string): acts like ValidateBytes but its argument is string.

Example

This code validates an object that should have name and age fields.

package main

import "github.com/miladibra10/vjson"

func main() {
    schema := vjson.NewSchema(
        vjson.String("name").Required(),
        vjson.Integer("age").Positive(),
    )

    jsonString := `
    {

  "required": true,
  "value": false"name": "James"
    }
    `

    err := schema.ValidateString(jsonString)
    if err != nil {
        panic(err) // Will not panic
    }

    jsonString = `
    {
        "name": "James",
        "age": 10
    }
    `

    err = schema.ValidateString(jsonString)
    if err != nil {
        panic(err) // Will not panic
    }

    jsonString = `
    {
        "age": 10
    }
    `

    err = schema.ValidateString(jsonString)
    if err != nil {
        panic(err) // Will panic because name field is missing in jsonString
    }

}

Benchmarks

Results of benchmarking validation functions highly depends on types and number of fields.

two simple benchmarks (exists in schema_test.go file) with using all features of vjson gives this result:

goos: linux
goarch: amd64
pkg: github.com/miladibra10/vjson
BenchmarkSchema_ValidateString-8          416664              2792 ns/op
BenchmarkSchema_ValidateBytes-8           431734              2858 ns/op
PASS
ok      github.com/miladibra10/vjson    2.461s